Persian (Farsi) Translation Services

Whether you are looking for Persian (Farsi) translation for something technical, legal or medical, or simply a letter, we can help you.

Lingua Translations is known for its quality-driven Farsi translation services or as it is also known as, Persian translation.

We will equip you with knowledge and methods, enabling you to communicate in the correct style and tone, reaching your target audience and effectively communicating with ease.

We offer a professional Farsi to English and English to Farsi language translation service, and more. Here is some information which you will find useful as the Farsi language is full of interesting facts and essential tips when you are looking to communicate effectively in Farsi speaking countries.

LOCATION South-Central Asia
LANGUAGE FAMILY Indo-Iranian
RELATED LANGUAGES Also known as Persian
NUMBER OF GLOBAL SPEAKERS Approximately 110 million worldwide, located primarily in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan.
POPULATION Iran: 78 million, Afghanistan: 31 million, Tajikistan: 8 million

Persian or Farsi????

Persian, which is known by several names depending on the country in which it is spoken, is the official language of Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan, although it is not spoken universally by the populations of any of those countries. In Iran, it is spoken as a native language by around 60% of the population (around 45 million people). Similarly, it is the first language of around 7.6 million people in Afghanistan and surrounding areas, and by 4.5 million people in Tajikistan and parts of Uzbekistan. In Iran, the Persian spoken is known as Farsi, in Afghanistan it is known as Dari and in Tajikistan it is called Tajik. It is the most widely spoken of all the Indo-Iranian languages.

Whether you need your website localised into the Persian language, the transcreation of your advertising campaign or the translation and certification of legal or medical documents, Lingua Translations can provide expert Persian translators for your every need, no matter what the product.

Persian (Farsi) Script

The Persian script is a version of Arabic script and it is similar to Arabic because it is also read and written from right to left, rather than left to right like English. It is a cursive script, which means that its letters look different depending on whether they are isolated or at the beginning, middle or end of a word.

The Persian alphabet is made up of 32 letters, and small dots or diacritics are employed to change how letters and vowels are pronounced. For example, take the Persian letter “b” ( ):

These are all variations of the letter “b”, and the symbols tell the speaker how to pronounce the accompanying vowel sound.

Dialects of Persian (Farsi)

There are three modern dialects of standard Persian which can be broadly differentiated by the countries in which they are spoken. Western Persian (Farsi) is spoken in Iran, Eastern Persian (Dari) is spoken in Afghanistan and Tajik Persian is spoken in Tajikistan and Uzbekistan.

The differences between Farsi and Dari come from the geographical isolation of Afghanistan – Dari has not shared in the development of new, modern words as much as Iranian Farsi, but has more adapted old words to suit a more modern usage.

Farsi and Dari are mutually comprehensible and differences mainly arise in spoken language, as opposed to the written language which is fairly similar. It is worth mentioning that many speakers of Afghan Dari still call the language Farsi.

Here are some differences in vocabulary between Farsi and Dari:

In Farsi, the word for “fork” is changal (چنگال), whereas in Dari it is panja (پنجه).
In Dari, the word for “duck” literally translates as “water-chicken”! It is murgh-abi (مرغابی), but in Farsi it is the more simple ardak (اردک).
Tajik is a little more different in that it represents a more archaic form of Persian and has retained more aspects of ancient Iranian, from which Farsi, Dari and Tajiki developed. Also, during the Soviet Era, the Tajiki script was changed to a Cyrillic script, whereas Farsi and Dari use a modified Arabic script.

Differences between Persian (Farsi) and English

English has more vowel sounds and diphthongs than Farsi, meaning that native Farsi learners of English struggle to tell the difference between and correctly pronounce certain sounds (e.g. between beat/bit, cot/caught or pool/pull).
Word order is very different in Farsi. Adjectives always follow the noun, rather than precede it in English. Verbs usually come at the end of a sentence. This would produce a word order like “Last week tree green I saw.”
Auxiliary words that English uses to ask questions do not exist in Farsi, i.e. “Do you like spaghetti?” Instead, a rising pitch is used to indicate a question: “You like spaghetti [rising pitch on spaghetti]?”.
Definite and indefinite articles do not exist in Farsi, which can lead to some confusion when translating into English because the sentence can sometimes be ambiguous if it lacks context.
There is not a separate pronoun for “he” and “she” in Farsi!

TUI TRAVEL GROUP

Ian Chapman – Director of Holiday Experience –

“Lingua Translations provides instant multi-lingual options for TUI’s 24/7 Holidayline, so 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year TUI’s customers are connected to an interpreter instantaneously. This service is designed to help holidaymakers who find themselves in difficulty and require non-English language assistance.

The service offered by Lingua Translations provides us with instant translation for every destination we travel to, and has proved invaluable.”

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