Welsh Translation Services

Whether you are looking for a Welsh translation for something technical, legal or medical, or simply a letter, we can help you.

Planet Veritas is known for its quality-driven Welsh language translation services, after all – we are based in Wales!

We will equip you with knowledge and methods, enabling you to communicate in Welsh, whether you are looking for a formal or informal translation or you maybe need a Welsh interpreter, we can help. Remember, there is a difference between North and South!

We offer a professional Welsh to English and English to Welsh language translation and interpreting service. Here is some information which you will find useful as the Welsh language is full of interesting facts and essential tips when you are looking to communicate effectively in Welsh.

This post is also available in: Welsh

Welsh Speaking Countries

  • Welsh Translation and Interpreting Services

    Patagonia

  • Welsh Translation and Interpreting Services

    Wales

Regional Dialects

There are regional dialects, which means that the language used in South Wales and North Wales differs. If the translator is not adequately aware of this or does not prepare their translation bearing this factor in mind, it can result in too much of a localised translation, meaning that neutrality is an issue. For example, “How are you” can translate into Shwd i chi? in South Wales but Sut ‘da chi? in North Wales. Depending on the target audience of the translation (for example, when translating government documents), the translator must use a more neutral, grammatically correct form of Welsh, for example Sut wyt ti?

Formality Dependence

Linking to the issue of neutrality and register, there can also be several ways to say the same thing depending on formality. The English sentence “He is talking nonsense” could be translated informally as Ma fe’n siarad rwtsh (He’s talking rubbish), formally as Nid oes lawer o ffydd gen i am yr hyn y mae’n ei ddweud (I haven’t much faith with regards to what he is saying) or in more neutral, contemporary Welsh as Dwi ddim yn credu fe (I don’t believe him).

Circumflex Accent

The use of the circumflex accent (the little hat, as many language learners will know it by!) is very important in Welsh because it can completely change the meaning of a word. For example, tôn translates to English as “tone” but ton translates as “wave”.

Literal Translation

Literal translation does not necessarily mean correct translation! Taking the example of the English phrase “There is a lot of space in the lift”, if a Welsh translator were to translate this literally, it might read as Nid oes llawer o ofod yn y lifft or “There is not a lot of space (as in solar system, universe) in the lift”. To correctly translate this, the translator must be guided by appropriate Welsh convention rather than being “tied” to the source vocabulary. A more natural way to translate this would be: Nid oes llawer o le yn y lifft, or “There is not much “place” in the lift”, which is contextually correct.

Mutation

Certain words can “mutate” in a written context, depending on how they are used syntactically. For example, the Welsh translation of “Cardiff” is Caerdydd. But if you were to say “I live in Cardiff”, this would mutate to Dwi’n byw yng Nghaerdydd. Similarly, if you were to say “I come from Cardiff”, this would become Dwi’n dod o Gaerdydd.

This post is also available in: Welsh

TUI TRAVEL GROUP

Ian Chapman – Director of Holiday Experience –

“Planet Veritas provides instant multi-lingual options for TUI’s 24/7 Holidayline, so 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year TUI’s customers are connected to an interpreter instantaneously. This service is designed to help holidaymakers who find themselves in difficulty and require non-English language assistance.

The service offered by Planet Veritas provides us with instant translation for every destination we travel to, and has proved invaluable.”

This post is also available in: Welsh

This post is also available in: Welsh

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