Daily Archives - 30th December 2011

Understanding HTML; the hidden aspect of website translation services.

HTML; understanding the hidden aspect of website translation servicesAre you considering having your website translated? It’s worth bearing in mind that it won’t just be the visible content you’ll be working with, you’ll need to translate website HTML as well…underneath every website on the web lies source code, or, HTML (HyperText Markup Language). HTML is the vital component of many webpages and browsers use the HTML coding to interpret what is on the webpage and display it in a visual or audible format; when considering utilising website translation services it is vital not to overlook its importance…

Images and objects can be embedded in the HTML and it creates structured documents by ‘telling’ the browser the format for things like headings, paragraphs, lists and links etc. When looking into website translation services, or if you are a website translator yourself, the easiest way to go about the translation whilst preserving the formatting is to go into the HTML code and translate the text from there.

Now, go onto any webpage and click on ‘View source’ and the HTML coding will pop up in a new window; obviously you cannot just change the code from there, as otherwise the content of the internet would never be stable and some companies could wake up to a drastically different website than the one they fell asleep to the previous evening! You need to save the coding as a .txt file and open it in a suitable programme (for instance, Notepad), and work from there.

WYSIWYG editors (say it like wizza-wig, it means What You See Is What You Get) are the most popular tools for editing HTML code when you translate website content as they don’t require the user to have any prior in-depth knowledge of the code. However, it does have many flaws leading reputable website translation services providers to avoid using them, for example, depending on what programme you use, WYSIWYG editors have a nasty habit of arbitrarily adding code into the source code, usually solely for advertising their programme.

Here’s a short example of what it can look like:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>Hello HTML</title>
</head>
<body>
<p>Hello World!</p>
</body>
</html>

I recently taught myself how to make a table using HTML code…I was so impressed with myself! Have any of you ever had a similar Eureka! moment with HTML?

If you have any further questions about website translation, please visit our website translation services page.